Research

Research compiled on the topics of Secondary Education, English Education, Childhood Development, Adolescence, and Caterpillar / Butterfly Development.

Portfolio includes Research papers, Research-Based Narratives, and Creative Non-Fiction.

Atheism in the Classroom

Abstract: This paper discusses the major beliefs and ideas that surround Atheism—whether the belief in the human mind and self-reliance, or the belief in science. The paper argues for Atheism as a belief system, but it also discusses the idea that Atheism might not be considered a belief system or a religion, but simply the absence of faith in a higher power.  The text also discusses the difficulties surrounding Atheism in the classroom setting. However, Atheism can and should be integrated into the classroom setting and an educator can accomplish this by incorporating beliefs into discussion and being open and accepting of all student and parent perspectives.

Babies and Butterflies

As a part of my senior thesis at Waldorf College, I researched and compared child/adolescent and caterpillar/butterfly development in a year-long project entitled Cacophony. This creative non-fiction essay focuses specifically on birth to early childhood.

Excerpt: As a four-and-a-half-year-old, I remember touching my mother’s swollen stomach, feeling the tiny movements of feet and life beneath my fingertips. I remember my new sister’s nursery and its lavender and light green colors. I remember the obnoxious pink stork in the center of our lawn. And I remember the quiet bundle my father carried like a glass figurine in his arms.

Pupa and Puberty: Understanding the Chrysalis Stage

As a part of my senior thesis at Waldorf College, I researched and compared child/adolescent and caterpillar/butterfly development in a year-long project entitled Cacophony. This research-based narrative focuses specifically on adolescence and puberty in comparison to the chrysalis stage of the butterfly.

Excerpt: The word ‘puberty,’ for me, is one of those turn-off words. When I read it on a page, it makes me squeamish. But that’s just because I know it has to do with the horrible time in my life—middle school and early high school. Yes, from sixth grade until ninth grade, I was a whopping 4’11”, one of the shortest girls in my class. I was at least a head or two underneath everyone else, and if that wasn’t bad enough, my height-challenged awkwardness, accompanied with my newly-budding curves and breasts, made me into a stout, lumpy, square-shaped box. In not-so-nice-words: fat.

This Too Shall Pass

As a part of my senior thesis at Waldorf College, I researched and compared child/adolescent and caterpillar/butterfly development in a year-long project entitled Cacophony. This research-based narrative focuses specifically the transitions between young adulthood and adulthood.

Excerpt: As a high school sophomore, I wanted nothing more than to be my own person: to do things by myself, to learn all I could, to push the boundaries even. I was emotional, yes. At sixteen, I could be watching a love movie and smiling at all the wonderful, ‘Cinderella-story’ scenes. Then, in a matter of minutes, I’d be bawling, throwing dirty tissues at the screen. I could want nothing more than to be around all my friends, and then seconds later I’d want to curl up in a ball in my room. Most of all though, I wanted to rebel. I wanted to make my own mistakes, take reckless chances, go past the limits.

Fallen Angel

My hometown, Naperville, Illinois, has been considered ‘Ground Zero’ for heroin use since 2012. When I was emotionally affected by a neighbor’s death to the drug, I wrote this research-based narrative on the topic and on my connection to it being so prevalent in my home.

Excerpt: I wonder what it was like, when you died. Did the color gently drain out of your already-pale face? Or was it a sharp pain, like when the pinprick first pressed into your arm? I bet the scars across your wrists glowed a soft red in the haze of your dresser light. I bet you shrugged your left sweatshirt sleeve down to cover them, leaving the other pushed up over an emaciated right bicep, exposing an inner elbow, blue and thin.

Queuing Creativity: The Effect of Creative Writing in Secondary English and Reading Classrooms

Abstract: English and Reading are two of the most essential content areas of education, simply because they are prevalent in almost every college major and occupation. I am interested in the way that these two disciplines intersect, whether through strategies, practices, or classroom activities/assignments and I believe that intersecting the two disciplines is essential for any successful classroom curriculum.

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